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Tax brackets for 2021 and 2022

Get better acquainted with the 2021 and 2022 tax brackets, the various filing statuses, and the difference between taking the standard and itemized deductions.

As you review the tables below, keep in mind that your bracket depends on your taxable income and filing status. It’s also important to note that the income limits for all tax brackets and all filers were adjusted for inflation. 

Filing status and federal income tax rates – 2021 tax year 

Tax bracket

Single

Married filing jointly

Head of household

Married filing separately

10%

$0-$9,950

$0-$19,900

$0-$14,200

$0-$9,950

12%

$9,951

-$40,525

$19,901

-$81,050

$14,201

-$54,200

$9,951

-$40,525

22%

$40,526

-$86,375

$81,051

-$172,750

$54,201

-$86,350

$40,526

-$86,375

24%

$86,376–$164,925

$172,751–$329,850

$86,351–$164,900

$86,376–$164,925

32%

$164,926–$209,425

$329,851–$418,850

$164,901–$209,400

$164,926–$209,425

35%

$209,426–$523,600

$418,851–$628,300

$209,401–$523,600

$209,426–$314,150

37%

$523,600+

$628,300+

$523,600+

$314,150+

 

Filing status and federal income tax rates – 2022 tax year

Tax bracket

Single

Married filing jointly

Head of household

Married filing separately

 

10%

$0-$10,275

$0-$20,550

$0-$14,650

$0-$10,275

 

12%

$10,276-
$41,775 

$20,551-
$83,550 

$14,651-
$55,900 

$10,276-
$41,775 

 

22%

$41,776-
$89,075 

$83,551-
$178,150 

$55,901-
$89,050 

$41,776-
$89,075 

24%

$89,076- 

$170,050 

$178,151-
$340,100 

$89,051-
$170,050 

$89,076-
$170,050 

32%

$170,051- 

$215,950 

$340,101-
$431,900 

$170,051-
$215,950 

$170,051-
$215,950 

35%

$215,951- 

$539,900 

$431,901-
$647,850 

$215,951-
$539,900 

$215,951-
$323,925 

37%

$539,900+ 

$647,850+ 

$539,900+ 

$323,925+  

Please note: The tax brackets above are for the 2022 tax year. They are not used to calculate 2021 taxes. 

Filing statuses and definitions
 

Single

You’re either not married or you are legally separated as of Dec. 31 of the filing year AND you don't qualify for another status, like Head of Household.

Married filing jointly

You’re married on Dec. 31, and you and your spouse file a joint return together. This status can be available if one spouse died during the year.

Married filing separately

You’re married but you do not file a joint return with your spouse, and instead you both file separately. Spouses who file separate returns will generally have a higher combined tax than spouses who file joint returns because of benefits which apply to filing jointly.

Head of household

  • You’re not married and not a surviving spouse as of Dec 31 of the filing year AND
  • You paid over 50% of expenses to run your household for the year AND
  • Someone who counts as a “qualifying” individual (such as your child, if they meet certain conditions) lived with you for more than 50% of the year.

Qualifying widow or widower with a dependent child (Surviving Spouse Filing Status)

  • Your spouse must have died sometime in the previous 2 tax years AND
  • You must have been quali ed to file jointly with them AND
  • You’re not married AND
  • You paid over 50% of expenses to run your household for the tax year in question AND
  • Your dependent child lived with you during the tax year in question.

Standard deductions vs. Itemized deductions

Should you claim the standard deduction or itemize your deductions? If your itemized deductions equal more than the standard deduction, it may benefit you to itemize rather than claim the standard deduction.

Standard deductions

Itemized deductions

A fixed amount that is determined by your filing status - that indicates how much you’ll be able to reduce your adjusted gross income to determine your taxable income by when you calculate your taxes.

As an alternative to the standard deduction, taxpayers can itemize certain approved expenses, such as:

  • An amount of state and local taxes, including property taxes

  • Mortgage interest

  • Charitable contributions

  • Medical expenses (that exceed 7.5% of adjust gross income)

Our advisors partner with your tax professional to help determine the best approach to tax strategies.

Or, request an appointment online to speak with an advisor.

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At Ameriprise, the financial advice we give each of our clients is personalized, based on your goals and no one else's. 

If you know someone who could benefit from a conversation, please refer me.

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Ameriprise Financial, Inc. and its affiliates do not offer tax or legal advice. Consumers should consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding their specific situation.
Ameriprise Financial Services LLC. Member FINRA and SIPC.